Sushi of Peoria: Sushigawa

I’m a little late getting the review written, but a couple weeks ago we added Sushigawa to our Sushi Tour of Peoria (previous stop: Happy Fish ).

We got there a few minutes before it opened and walked in seconds after they unlocked the door. The first thing I noticed was that the background music was a song from Annie–I love Broadway musicals, and rarely run across them being played in local restaurants. The entire rest of the time we were were there the music sounded like anime soundtracks (I’m sure there’s a name for this musical style, but that’s the only association I have with it), which was also a lot of fun and worked really well for setting the feel for a sushi restaurant. At first I assumed that the Broadway music was just something the staff was playing and they hadn’t switched over to their normal music yet, but I’ve heard from other people now that Sushigawa also plays music like the La La Land soundtrack, so it seems like they just have a fun range of background music.

Anyway, moving on with the rest of the experience… The ambiance definitely worked well for us. It had the feel of a nice restaurant without being overly formal, and the decor all fit perfectly with that feel. The only odd part was the ordering process, which involved checking off our selections on a paper menu with provided pens. That would have fit better in a more casual atmosphere BUT I actually liked the simplicity of it and (as an introvert) not having the pressure of listing off verbally what I wanted.

The sushi itself came at pretty standard prices for what we’ve seen in Peoria. We got a Philadelphia roll, yellowtail (which we’d really liked at Happy Fish), plain tuna and salmon rolls, crunch spicy crab, and (I think) spicy salmon. Most of those were $5-$7 a roll, but the crunch spicy crab was a special roll for around $10. We were surprisingly unimpressed with all of their basic rolls. I enjoyed the Philadelphia roll, but most of the flavor came from the soy sauce and wasabi rather than the roll itself. Colton said the plain tuna and salmon were so bland that it was hard to tell which was which when eating them. The spicy crab, however, made up for the other rolls, because it was amazing!

It’s possible we just came on a week when they had a harder time than normal getting high quality fish or something like that. (I actually have no idea how sushi restaurants in Peoria usually manage to get any decent quality fish, but I’m sure it’s one of the challenges of running a sushi place in the midwest.) However, our impression based on this visit was that we wouldn’t come back for the basic rolls, but we’d love to go back and try more of their specialty rolls to see if they measure up to the spicy crunch crab roll. Overall verdict at this time is that Sushigawa is the place to go in Peoria if you’re planning to splurge on more expensive specialty rolls, but not worth it if you’re mostly planning to order basic rolls.  If we do go back I’ll post an update with our further findings.

Sushi of Peoria: Happy Fish

Colton and I ate sushi for the first time a few  years ago. We talked about how we should try sushi from every restaurant in town and compare them, but for a while we mostly settled in at a favorite restaurant, which with its unlimited sushi option, was particularly good for trying out sushi as newbies. (That restaurant was Hokkaido, in case you were wondering.)

Last week we finally decided to start our full sushi tour of Peoria with our first visit to Happy Fish.

We showed up a bit after 5 on a Tuesday evening, since we headed out pretty shortly after Colton got home from work. Happily, this landed right in the  middle of their “Happy Hour”–Monday through Friday, 4-6 PM they have a selection of maki rolls for $3.95 each along with similarly discounted prices on a couple of appetizers and nigiri options. The catch is that each person has to order a drink to get the special pricing, but since drinks were $1.95, it was still a very good deal.

To start with, Colton got sweetened iced green tea and I got hot green tea. Colton’s tea was very good, with a light fruity flavor. My tea came as a tea bag with a small mug, small tea pot of hot water and a piece of lemon to squeeze into it. I got several small cups of green tea out of the pot of hot water, and it worked with the fact that I felt like something hot to drink at that moment, but next time I would definitely get the iced green tea. (They also had the standard soda options and unsweetened black iced tea, none of which really appeal to me to go with sushi.)

We didn’t get any miso soup or any other appetizers on this particular night because we were focused on sushi. Colton ordered a spicy tuna roll (his standard for judging sushi quality), a california roll, and a yellowtail roll (which neither of us had tried before). I ordered a salmon and avocado roll and one of their specialty rolls which I’ve now forgotten the name of. I wasn’t paying enough attention to realize the specialty roll was one of the deep fried ones, which are much heavier than standard sushi, and I wouldn’t have intentionally chosen to go with the other rolls we ordered. (I did enjoy it though–it was a good version of deep fried sushi at least, with a spicy-sweet sauce I liked.)

For my taste, there was shortage of pickled ginger to go with the rolls. Aside from that, all the non-sushi elements of the experience (service, presentation, ambiance) were good in a low-key kind of way.

Overall, we enjoyed the meal. We would both order yellowtail sushi again sometime (which is particularly useful to know since Colton normally goes for tuna and I go for salmon). I would say the sushi was good but not great–not what I would describe as ‘chef’ level sushi. In Colton’s words, the flavors were ‘one note’ instead of being complex.

That said, during their happy hour, they have a cheapest sushi that I’m aware of in the Peoria area–we paid $26 (before tip) for the meal for the two of us. If we were going out for sushi at a time when we’d have to pay full price, I would choose to go somewhere else with better sushi for that price. But if we were going out around dinner time on a weekday, Happy Fish would be high on my list of options, because their sushi is well worth the discounted price.

The Life and Adventures of Raquel

Sometimes I think  my life would make a good Youtube show. Not a full TV show, or even a Netflix show, with its instantly bingeable seasons. Just some short episodes  like the old radio soap operas, but without the break-ups, and more of a dramedy.

Take last weekend. As part of a one car household, I order a lot of essentials delivered to the house, so that I don’t often have to get the car to go pick one thing, and only have to make grocery store trips once every week or two. Often, I order my thyroid medication shipped to the house.

So, last Friday I take my last thyroid pill in the bottle and check the tracking number. It’s scheduled to be delivered Saturday. This isn’t really optimal, because our mail won’t be delivered until mid-morning, and circadian rhythms interacting with thyroid meds mean that taking the pill the same time of day is a big deal. (Think about that next time you say that daylight savings time isn’t a big deal because you can just go to bed an hour earlier…)

The complication is that I’m out of refills on my thyroid meds, and so even if I tried to put in a new refill to pick up at the store that evening, there’s no way the doctor’s office would respond to the refill request before they closed down for the weekend anyway. (Believe me, I’ve tried before. If you have to send in a refill request on a Friday for an urgent refill you’re in trouble.) Getting my thyroid pill just a few hours late on Saturday is acceptable.

Saturday morning I wake up and check the tracking number. (cue dramatic music) The package was delayed. It reads that my package was in town and then left again, for no discernible reason.  Monday is now the soonest I can get my thyroid medication. (Remember, I still have no refills, and the doctor’s office is now closed for the weekend.)

I muddle through my day, feeling only slightly zombieish, which means my overall health is doing a lot better than a few years ago, when I missed a thyroid pill and felt like death warmed over. I take essential oils. I fix some decaf coffee and add every thyroid boosting substance I  have in the house, starting with coconut oil.

Now, this is where we pick up one of those slow sub-plot threads that’s been building for many episodes. On this Saturday, I walk down to the library, despite feeling slightly zombieish, because I have my first ever inter-library loan waiting for me.

I’ve put books on hold from other libraries in the system many times, but this book came from outside the local system, and required a librarian to fill in a paper card for me instead of me just clicking a button on the website. The rules are unclear to me, and I’m not sure how long they’ll hold an inter-library loan before sending it back, and it doesn’t even show up in my account as a hold when I check the website. I can’t risk it being sent back and having to go through that whole paper system again. (I do occasionally act my generation… “What do you mean I can’t do this on a website? And what is this paper stuff you speak of?”)

At the library, when the clerk hands me the book without a receipt (okay, I guess I do like paper sometimes) OR a comment about when it’s due back (I normally get both when I check out a book), my T3 lacking brain isn’t sure how to handle the situation. I take the book, walk off a few steps and have a sudden fear that I’m not actually supposed to leave yet, and stop and stare at the front of the book as though examining it for information for a good ten seconds before I slowly risk actually walking off with it. No one tries to stop me, so apparently inter-library loans are just weird like that.

As I walk up the driveway holding my not-actually-stolen library book I notice the corner of a package sticking up out of the mailbox by our front door. Huh. That looks a lot like the packaging my thyroid meds get mailed in. I walk up to the mailbox. The return address matches the one on the tracking number and the package definitely feels like it contains my thyroid meds.

The package does, in fact, contain my thyroid meds.

Tracking numbers are often helpful and occasionally the stupidest things ever.

So, it turns out that providentially I didn’t have to go an entire weekend without sufficient supply of vital energy supplying hormones, and that the timing of my first inter-library loan was surprisingly important to my timely discovery of  said hormones being available in my mail box. (Did I mention that tracking numbers are occasionally stupid?) Basically, my life would make a good YouTube show  because God writes better plots than I do.

Plot Twist

 

On Mathematics: Multiplication Tricks and the Concept of Zero

I’m finally getting back to reading Here’s Looking at Euclid, and am determined to finish up some of the non-fiction books that have been sitting in my reading pile for an embarrassingly long time.

I’m mostly posting about chapter three because I want a place to stash this quote about Indian/Vedic multiplications tricks which I found interesting:

Vertically and Crosswise, or “cross-multiplication,” is faster, uses less space and less laborious than long multiplication. Kenneth Williams told me that whenever he explains the Vedic method to school pupils they find it easy to understand. “They can’t believe they weren’t taught it before,” he said. Schools favor long multiplication because it spells out every stage of the calculation. Vertically and Crosswise keeps some of the machinery hidden. Williams things this is no bad thing, and may even help less bright pupils. “We have to steer a path and not insist that kids have to know everything all of the time. Some kids need to know how [multiplication] works. Some don’t want to know how it works. They just want to be able to do it.” ‘

This makes sense to me because I’m a huge fan of specialization. Yes, most kids probably need to know HOW their math works, but for a kid who’s struggling with it, it probably makes more sense to teach them a trick so they can do it, and focus on honing their skills where they excel, instead of spending hours and hours on something they may never excel at, and likely teaching them to hate it in the process.

The other thing that stood out to me about this chapter was the commentary on the Indian discovery of zero being related to their religious understanding of the importance of ‘nothing’ or the void. This bothers me a little as I doubt I agree with their emphasis on nothingness, but I do think the concept of zero is important and helpful in mathematics, and would like to be able to figure out the true philosophical reason behind that.

Perhaps they simply over emphasize the importance of zero as an existent entity, and the proper understanding is closer to it actually being a placeholder for nothing, but I would love to see a Christian worldview explanation of the concept of zero, as I just can’t quite figure out where to start in exploring the philosophical underpinnings.

Of Dreams and Plans

Every January I start to get the urge to evaluate my life and figure out what I want to be doing that I’m not doing, or at least haven’t finished achieving yet. Colton seems to mange to continuously update his plans and priorities and can’t figure out why January would have this effect on me. So this year I took a little different strategy and made a list of dreams and planned to pick one to work on every 4-6 weeks through the year.

Unsurprisingly, I’ve gotten distracted with a lot of daily life and don’t seem to make a lot of progress. According to my list the last time I picked a dream to work on was in April, and I know I didn’t actually do anything with it.

Oddly enough, a part of my dream to travel to Europe, which wasn’t even on the docket for this year, is coming true this fall. Colton has a work trip to Ireland and I get to tag along. I’m still holding out for a full tour of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales someday, but for now, a few days in Dublin will do just fine.

Aside from travel though, I’m discovering the the core of my dreams is really to do some combination of creative writing and nutritional coaching. (Well, that and being able to sing on key.) I really enjoyed the writing I did for my food blog, and to some extent the videos I made for it, though those were also stress inducing. (Yes, random guy on the internet, it is possible to care about healthy eating and still have fat arms. FYI.) But what I really, really loved was the few comments I got about how people started using my homemade ketchup all the time, or how small children devoured green beans made from my recipe. I loved giving people one small, doable step toward living healthier.

And, honestly, that’s why I started sharing about Plexus. Because I really want to help people get healthier, and because it give me chance to talk to people about their health and nutrition one on one, and figure out personalized suggestions for what might help them.

If I do very well with Plexus maybe someday it can even fund that full Europe trip I’d love to make, but what would make me very happy is if sharing Plexus resulted in lots of stories of other people finally having energy to go do all the things they’ve always wanted to do.

Unfortunately, I don’t think Plexus will ever solve my singing off-key problems.

The Perfect Desk

I have wanted a desk for several years now. I had a desk when I was teenager, and used it for very important tasks like writing journal entries, but I didn’t have the opportunity to use a desk to it’s full potential at the time. (I guess that depends on how you look at it though–my largest desk drawer was full of Agatha Christie novels.)

In the apartment all of my ‘desk stuff’ like the expandable file folder and bills to be paid got stored on one shelf of a bookshelf, and it all inevitably jumbled not that long after every time I organized it. Now that we have a house, we have room for Colton and I to have side by side desks in the dining room.

As I began browsing used furniture I quickly discovered that I have expensive taste in desks. My favorites were always the roll top desks, with the appeal of being able to stop in the middle of paying bills or balancing the checkbook, but instantly hide the mess. Since the roll tops generally sold for around $300, I started trying to convince myself that I should stick with looking for the true non-negotiables, like drawers for storing all my desk stuff inside of.

I started checking Craigslist frequently, and talking myself down to a reasonable desk, until one day I saw that roll top desk had just been posted for $50. It had only been posted a few hours before, and I promptly claimed the first chance to go inspect it. (After checking with Colton if he thought it was worth driving 30 minutes to look at the desk. He said no desk was worth driving to P—- for, but then gave his serious answer that it looked like a good deal.)

I began conferring with the seller about the details of coming to see it. Was it very heavy? Oh, yes, it was so very heavy, and they didn’t actually live where the desk was, so we had to come look at it during the day, and her husband had just had surgery so he wouldn’t be able to help with the lifting. Since Colton doesn’t have a lot of spare time off this  year, I fell back on the plan of drafting nephews to carry the desk… until I got an e-mail that someone had agreed to buy the desk without having seen it.

My desk…

A few days later I heard that the buyer never completed arrangements to come pick up the desk, so I was back to having first chance to come look at it. Yay!

I drafted one nephew to come along, having remembered in the meantime that the other nephew I had intended to draft now has gainful employment which keeps him too busy during daytime hours to come move desks for me. (That pesky getting-older-and-getting-jobs thing…) Then I mildly agonized for a while about whether the heaviness of the desk was exaggerated and whether between me and my nephew Peter and my sister Merrianna if we would be able to load the desk into the car.

The first part of the adventure happened when we discovered that my phone (the only smart phone in the car, and our only source of directions to the location of the desk) was about to die and we didn’t have a charger. Peter copied down the directions into the sketchbook he’d brought along and then Merrianna continued navigating from the almost dead phone. I missed a turn (it was the shortest ‘100 yards’ in the  history of directions, is all I have to say), and began following the rerouted directions when the phone died.

Peter and Merrianna had much conferring about the remembered parts of directions compared to what was written on the sketchbook, and we somehow arrived at our destination with a deal of confusion, but without ever actually having to turn around.

This is when part 2 of our adventure started. We were greeted by a very sweet lady, with whom I’d been communicating, and her brother (not her husband, and presumably, not having just had surgery). I checked the desk, and despite a bit of sticking in the roll top part of the desk, quickly decided that I would take the desk.

The sellers, however, were very concerned about whether the large desk would fit inside our mini-van. They carefully measured many dimensions of both the desk and the inside of the mini-van, and then carefully re-measured when they couldn’t remember the original measurements.

I had been pretty sure from the beginning that the desk would fit, and the measurements sounded like a good match even without remembering the exact numbers in every case. In addition to this, I had picked up one end of the desk as I examined it.

It wasn’t that heavy at all.

We could have easily just picked up the desk, walked it out the mini-van to see if it would fit, and taken it back inside if it didn’t.

Instead, I just tried to direct events in the direction of more action and less measuring. “Yep, that looks like it should fit… Uh huh… Hmm… Okay, let’s give it a try… Yes, on its back… It really seems like that should work… I think we should go ahead and try it.”

Peter and the brother carried the desk to the mini-van while Merrianna and I watched and the very sweet lady gave me tips for what kind of furniture polish to buy if my desk happened to get accidentally scratched on the way home. (I didn’t tell her that I would probably never even notice if the desk got scratched up…)

The desk fit perfectly into the back of the mini-van, with the minor inconvenience of having to be lifted over the metal U-hooks that protrude from the sides of the back hatch. Merrianna and I even got to assist briefly by holding corners of the desk as it was flipped on its back.

We climbed back into the car, slightly exhausted from the social effort of buying a desk from such nice people, and Peter began to reverse the directions so that we could escape the tiny neighborhood in which we were cornered. Despite the fact that the desk turned out to not be heavy at all, it turned out the Peter was essential to the escapade, as he was the keeper of the directions (and the owner of pencil and paper).

And that is the story of how I am sitting and typing this blog post at a lovely, ever so slightly scratched roll top desk (which only sticks a little when you try to put down the roll top lid).